Lytro

The Lytro is the first commercially available light-field camera. There’s been a lot of buzz (and even controversy) surrounding this revolutionary focus-later device, but it’s not clear whether this is an important development or just a gimmick. Frederick interviewed the folks at Lytro before the camera was released, and now I’ve spent two weeks putting it through its paces, learning about the science and technology of light-field photography, and figuring out whether you might want to own one. Watch the review on All About the Gear.

Lytro-Title

Sony a7 (and a7R)

The long-anticipated Sony a7 and a7R have been called the cameras of the year by some. I was an early fanboy, but does the a7 live up to the hype and my expectations?

The a7 and a7R are the first full-frame, mirrorless, autofocusing interchangeable-lens cameras. Together, they’re strong competitors for the Leica 240 and the Nikon D800E. But the native lens selection is meager. The sweet spot may be to combine the new Sonys with third-party lenses.
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Gear for Sale

End of the year means “out with the old and in with the new”. As I downsize from big Nikons to the Sony Alphas and upsize from the NEX series, I’ve got some gear to sell.

  • Nikon D600 w/24-85mm lens $1,500 (original box, etc.)
  • Nikon 18-200mm G VR $325
  • Nikon 24mm f/2.8 D $200 (original box, etc.)
  • Nikon 35mm f/2 D $250 (original box, etc.)
  • Nikon 50mm f/1.8 D $75 (original box, etc.)
  • Nikon 85mm f/1.8 G $425 (original box, etc.)
  • Nikon 135mm f/2 DC $950 (a very unique lens!)
  • Sony NEX-7 w/18-55mm lens $850 (original box, etc.)
  • Sony 50mm f.1.8 $200
  • Really Right Stuff D600 L-bracket $120
  • Really Right Stuff D000 L-bracket $100
  • Canon S95 $150 (original box, etc.)