Google Rankings

This is pretty cool. Search Google for one of the recent celebrity interviews on IT Conversations such as Malcolm Gladwell or Thomas Barnett. Are you getting the same results as I am? Do the links to IT Conversations appear in the #2 or #3 positions? Or does this have something to do with the fact that I have Google desktop also running on my machine and Google knows I’m interested in IT Conversations? I’d like to think that Google’s algorithms believe IT Conversations is that important and credible for everyone on the ‘Net, but given how much is written by and about people like Malcolm and Tom, I find that hard to believe. What results do you see?

8 thoughts on “Google Rankings

  1. Doug, I’m seeing the same results as you are.

    In fact, for Malcolm Gladwell, not only is IT Conversations the second result, but the third is a BoingBoing post pointing to IT Conversations.

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  2. Doug, I see the same results. This probably has something to do with the number of bloggers who link to IT Conversations, but that’s not to say that the rankings aren’t deserved!
    Cheers
    Mike

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  3. From what I’ve read of the way Google Desktop works, it *couldn’t* alter the main Google results. It just slips the desktop results into the HTML when the page gets loaded – the actual results from Google stay as they are, you just get a section at the top telling you if there’s any local results too.

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  4. You’re getting placement because your content is relevant, syndicated and fresh. Google itself has made you relevant by giving you a decent Page Rank (PR). So when you headline a name, it gets strong placement. If those syndicating your feed link to it by the name of the subject or person interviewed, your placement sticks. If Corante or any other blog with PR6 or higher interviews Gladwell or Barnett, they will trump your current well-deserved position. Google’s algo gets tweaked occasionally and its database dances once every six weeks but results you’re getting reward the community who look for relevance. And you’re relevant–at least to the Googlebot.

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